Sharing is a fundamental part of iAuditor. It controls (1) who gets access to which templates to complete inspections, and (2) who automatically receives the results of those inspections.

In this article, we summarize our how-to guide with some important questions you’ll want to ask yourself before getting started with your sharing setup. You will find some best-practice recommendations and real-world examples to provide further context into one of the essential aspects of iAuditor team management.

IMPORTANT NOTE

If you need to apply the changes you make to your sharing setup retroactively, please contact our customer support team.

Template sharing best practices

  1. Always use Advanced Sharing, it gives better visibility of your sharing structure.
  2. Create groups, even if you only have one user in that group. If you share the inspection template with a group instead of an individual (directly), you can move users in and out of that group without affecting your sharing.
  3. In larger teams, you may not want to give users the edit permission for a given Template. With the edit permission, users can edit the structure of your template or duplicate templates, often resulting in sharing and data review issues.
  4. Use permissions to strengthen your organization’s structure. Permissions control access to full feature suites, while sharing controls access to a specific template/inspection result. For example, permissions allow you to restrict users from creating templates and download from the Public Library (Template Creation), or further limit access to make organizational changes like billing and group management.

Inspection sharing best practices

  1. Continue to use Advanced Sharing, as it gives better visibility of your sharing structure.
  2. Use groups, even if you only have one user in that group. If you share inspection results with a group, instead of an individual (directly), you can move users in and out of that group without affecting your sharing and the historical data attached.
  3. In most cases, you don’t want to let users have edit permission to each other’s inspections. Think about who needs access to be able to edit inspection results.

Question 1: Who needs to conduct the inspection (template)?

This is the first question you should ask. Who, from your team, needs to conduct this inspection? The answer to this question effectively sets up step 1 of the sharing process: your template sharing. In this step, you’re granting access to the inspection template so that your teams can use a consistent inspection structure across the board.

Remember to use groups wherever possible, even if it’s just for one user. This allows you to set your sharing structure up correctly from the beginning and gives you greater autonomy when users move between teams. Once you know who, then you need to settle on the level of access you want this user or group to have.

Question 2: What level of access does this group (of users) need for the template?

Following from question 1, you now need to decide what the user or group can carry out with the template. To proceed, share the template to that user or group with the appropriate permission (shown below).

Template Sharing Permissions

  1. View - this allows a user or group to complete an inspection on the given template.
  2. View & Edit - with this permission, a user or group can edit the structure of the template. Additionally, this allows a user to duplicate and alter the sharing of the template.
    Pro Tip: be careful with whom you grant this permission. Ask yourself, do you want these users to be able to edit the structure of the template? Do the users need to be able to duplicate or adjust the sharing of the template?
  3. View, Edit & Delete - groups or users have access to all of the above, and the additional ability to archive and delete the template.
    Pro Tip: further restrict this access to only those users who need this ability.
IMPORTANT NOTE

These permissions are specific to sharing templates. They sit separately to feature access permissions.

Question 3: Who needs to see that group’s completed or in-progress inspection results?

Questions 1 & 2 identify which groups/users have access to your template (to complete inspections), and what permission level they require. At this point, you would have granted the user or group access to the template itself accordingly.

This leads to our next question, who sees these completed and in-progress inspection results? We recommend the use of groups for this as well. If you set up the sharing of your inspections to a group from the beginning, then you do not have to apply any changes going forward retroactively. The group sharing setup means that you can move individual users in and out of the group without having to make changes to your sharing structure.

Question 4: What level of access does this group (of users) need to the inspection results?

Now that you know who needs to review inspections, you need to again decide on what level of access that these groups or users need. These permissions are similar to that of templates but apply solely to in-progress and complete inspection data.

Inspection sharing permissions

  1. View - this allows a user or group to view a completed or in-progress inspection, and download a copy in their chosen format (PDF, Word, CSV, etc.) without the ability to change any chosen answers.
  2. View & Edit - with this permission, a user or group can edit the answers within the inspection. This permission setting allows a user to duplicate (mobile app only) and alter the sharing of the inspection.
  3. View, Edit & Delete - groups or users have access to all of the above, and the additional ability to archive and delete the inspection results.
IMPORTANT NOTE

The user who starts the inspection is by default the “owner” of the inspection, meaning the user would have view, edit & delete permission to inspections they own.

Sample sharing setup

Here we use a template named “Daily Room Check”, which is owned by Shaun Cole as an example. Following the above guidelines, Shaun would first need to decide:

  1. Who needs to complete an inspection?
    Shaun wants users Craig and Bethany to be able to complete inspections on this template.
    IMPORTANT NOTE

    Craig and Bethany both need the same level of access. It would be a good idea here to create a group. In this example, Shaun has added Craig and Bethany to a group called “Housekeepers”.

  2. What level of access do these users need?
    Shaun wants them to be able to complete inspections but not make changes to the template. In this case, Shaun has given the group view permission.
  3. Who needs to see or review the users' inspections?
    The managers in Shaun’s quality department need to monitor these inspections. This department consists of three people: Mike, Emily, and Charlie.
    IMPORTANT NOTE

    These users need the same level of access to the inspection results. Therefore, Shaun has added them to a group called “Housekeepers Managers”.

  4. What level of access do these users need?
    Since this group is composed of housekeeping managers, they may need to make minor changes to inspections at times, but Shaun doesn’t want them to be able to remove data. So Shaun has given the group “View & Edit” permission.

Take a look at the sharing structure Shaun created by following the above process.

You can also see this in a hierarchical format that may help you understand the sharing structure.

Now that you’ve decided on your sharing structure, learn how to set up template and inspection sharing from our step by step guide.

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